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Sitar meets didgeridoo in Slovakia

THE SLOVAK band called Dúhové eminencie (Rainbow Eminences) plays a unique combination of world music, local folksongs, Australian and Indian music, jazz and even more genres. To launch their new album Posolstvo od protinožcov (A Message from Down Under) which is primarily based on the didgeridoo, a native Australian aboriginal instrument, as well as the Indian sitar, the band recently undertook a tour of four concerts joined by Australian musician Charlie McMahon.

THE SLOVAK band called Dúhové eminencie (Rainbow Eminences) plays a unique combination of world music, local folksongs, Australian and Indian music, jazz and even more genres. To launch their new album Posolstvo od protinožcov (A Message from Down Under) which is primarily based on the didgeridoo, a native Australian aboriginal instrument, as well as the Indian sitar, the band recently undertook a tour of four concerts joined by Australian musician Charlie McMahon.

“I met Braňo (Branislav Hargaš of Rainbow Eminences) in Australia and we became friends. When I was in Europe to play in the UK and Germany I had a few days off and I came to play with his band in Slovakia,” McMahon told The Slovak Spectator. “And I came to like your countryside; walking around with Branislav, I was impressed by your berries and mushrooms.”

McMahon said he played the didjeribone, a special type of instrument he created himself. Unique and exotic instruments are also integral to the Slovak band, who play a range of traditional instruments from all corners of the world, combining instruments such as the Turkish saz (or baglama), the Australian didgeridoo and the Indian sitar. Braňo Hargaš also created a hybrid of the two latter instruments called the Tuhar, and it reportedly is the only stringed-didgeridoo instrument in the world.

The Rainbow Eminences launched their new album in clubs in Nové Mesto nad Váhom on June 27, in Brezno on June 28, in Banská Bystrica on June 29 and in Bratislava on June 30. Even though the Bratislava concert had far from a full audience, perhaps due to the sweltering temperature or competition from many other events, the musicians were fully into their performance, creating a great atmosphere and welcoming visitors to an after party featuring world disco music.

Rainbow Eminences play in Slovakia as well as abroad where they learn to play new instruments and many hope that they will play more concerts, not only ones to support the release of their new album. The emerging Slovak acceptance of world music might lead larger audiences to enjoy their innovative approach and their ability to befriend excellent foreign musicians and bring them to Slovakia.

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