Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

TIS: Two thirds of managers in state-run companies change after elections

Managers of companies fully owned by state or local municipalities change in line with the results of general elections and are usually replaced within one year of the vote, according to a report published by the political ethics watchdog Transparency International Slovensko (TIS). Such a situation makes the companies unstable and prompts them to focus on short-term goals, the TASR newswire reported.

Managers of companies fully owned by state or local municipalities change in line with the results of general elections and are usually replaced within one year of the vote, according to a report published by the political ethics watchdog Transparency International Slovensko (TIS). Such a situation makes the companies unstable and prompts them to focus on short-term goals, the TASR newswire reported.

The head of TIS, Gabriel Šípoš, told a press conference on July 10 that only about 10 percent of the managers in companies and their supervisory bodies’ officials hold their posts for more than one electoral term, which as a rule is four years, while the average length of tenure in managerial posts stands at just two years.

The highest degree of managerial turnover was observed at state-owned pharmaceutical company Biont and at the Military Maintenance Company in Nováky, Trenčín Region, where managers tended to be replaced after an average of only 15 months. On the other hand, at the Central Slovak Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Poprad Hospital and oil-pipeline system operator Transpetrol 70 percent of managers are likely to retain their posts even after a general election, the report stated.

TIS also evaluated the companies’ transparency. The criteria used for this included companies’ willingness to provide information about their operations and financial management. The results showed that the most transparent companies in Slovakia are passenger rail carrier Železničná Spoločnosť Slovensko (ZSSK) and public-service broadcaster Radio and Television of Slovakia (RTVS).

On the other hand, two in three companies did not even reply to the request for information sent by TIS, even though they are in theory obliged by law to disclose the data it sought, TASR wrote.

Moreover, two-thirds of companies failed to provide the watchdog with information about the salaries of members of their management or their curriculum vitae, while half the companies refused to disclose their contracts for cleaning services.

“Basically, we do not know how state money is handled, because they [the companies] refuse to undergo an inspection,” said Šípoš, as quoted by TASR.

In addition to this, TIS found that the companies also have problems with internal ethics. Three in four lack a code of conduct or a formal process to shield employees who try to report corruption.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Night life in Bratislava will not end

Councillors for the Old Town adopt new opening hours for pubs, night clubs and restaurants.

Cvernovka's creative talents celebrate first open day at new premises Photo

Bratislava's art and design ateliers from the old yarn-making factory open their doors on May Day.

New premises for Cvernovka

How social networks can earn you a ticket to Germany

Can a status on a social network change someone’s life? Yes, if you write humorous stories about a fictive German ambassador.

Assaf Alassaf (r) talked about his life and his book in Bratislava

New investor to create 500 jobs in Nitra

A company following the Jaguar Land Rover carmaker to Nitra plans to create 500 new jobs and invest €17 million.

Tha Jaguar Land Rover draws also other investors to Nitra.