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Slovakia commemorates SNP

Several events took place in Slovakia to commemorate the 68th anniversary of the beginning of Slovak National Uprising (SNP), an armed insurrection organised by the Slovak resistance movement during the Second World War. The uprising broke out in Banská Bystrica on August 29, 1944, and even though it was officially suppressed in October 1944, the rebels continued to operate in secret, fighting and sabotaging German armies until the end of the war.

Several events took place in Slovakia to commemorate the 68th anniversary of the beginning of Slovak National Uprising (SNP), an armed insurrection organised by the Slovak resistance movement during the Second World War. The uprising broke out in Banská Bystrica on August 29, 1944, and even though it was officially suppressed in October 1944, the rebels continued to operate in secret, fighting and sabotaging German armies until the end of the war.

The official ceremony occurred in Banská Bystrica on August 29. The ceremony was attended by around 2,500 people, mostly elderly and members of the Slovak Association of Anti-fascist Fighters (SZPB). The number of direct participants in the SNP ceremony is decreasing every year, however, with only a handful of them still appearing at the event, the TASR newswire reported.

The politicians highlighted unity, solidarity and morale as being typical characteristics of the Slovak soldiers and civilians who participated in SNP.

“Today’s politicians also should draw inspiration from the well of the Uprising, which united the entire nation,” said President Ivan Gašparovič, as quoted by TASR, adding that this message must continuously remind both young and middle-aged generations of the importance of the SNP.

Prime Minister Robert Fico stressed that unity and solidarity are necessary especially during the current tumultuous economic situation in Europe. He highlighted that another important attribute brought about by the SNP was justice.

“Experience of the Uprising, which meant a direct confrontation with inhumaneness and the courage to resist evil with arms in hands, has taught Slovak men and women the value of justice,” he said, as quoted by TASR.

Bratislava also commemorated the anniversary, with several politicians and state officials attending a ceremony that took place on August 28.

Part of the event involved the official renaming of the New Bridge to SNP Bridge, the name it held between 1972 and 1993.

The idea to rename the bridge was first announced by the mayor of Bratislava’s Old Town borough (Staré Mesto), Tatiana Rosová, at the SNP commemoration that took place last year. The deputies of the Old Town council approved the change in February 2012, and the members of the Bratislava city council passed the proposal one month later, despite the opinion of some deputies that the reintroduction of the name may cause confusion among foreign tourists, TASR reported.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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