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Charges against Ďurkovský dropped

THE OFFICE of the General Prosecutor has dropped charges against Andrej Ďurkovský, the former mayor of Bratislava, who had been accused of mismanagement of public property. Ďurkovský had agreed to the demolition of PKO, a popular cultural centre by the Danube River, the TASR newswire reported on August 26.

THE OFFICE of the General Prosecutor has dropped charges against Andrej Ďurkovský, the former mayor of Bratislava, who had been accused of mismanagement of public property. Ďurkovský had agreed to the demolition of PKO, a popular cultural centre by the Danube River, the TASR newswire reported on August 26.

The prosecutor’s office stated that Ďurkovský did not break any law and that there was thus no reason to bring charges against him. It returned the case to investigators, saying they should re-open the case.

The former Bratislava mayor signed an agreement to demolish PKO with an investor, Henbury Development, in June 2006. At the same time, Ďurkovský promised to submit a request to start demolition of the existing building to the local construction office. The police investigator claimed that Ďurkovský agreed the demolition of PKO without the consent of Bratislava councillors despite being obliged to do so according to a regulation passed in June 2005.

At the time the charges were brought, Ďurkovský was sitting as an MP for the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) and was protected by parliamentary immunity. Police sought parliament’s permission to prosecute him, but MPs refused. Ďurkovský was finally charged in April 2012, after leaving parliament, TASR reported.

Meanwhile, the Regional Court dismissed the ruling which allowed Henbury Development to demolish the PKO building, saying that the rights of the city in the case were violated when the district court that was dealing with the issue failed to postpone proceedings while the city picked a lawyer through a public tender. As a result, the Regional Court found, the basic right of Bratislava to a fair process was violated and the participants in the proceeding were put in unequal positions, TASR wrote on August 20.

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