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New shopping centres change the culture of shopping

THE INCREASING number of shopping centres in Slovakia is gradually changing the culture of shopping. Up to three thirds of Slovaks visit a shopping centre at least once a month, while the average sum they spend stands at €52, according to the latest survey carried out by the GfK company.

THE INCREASING number of shopping centres in Slovakia is gradually changing the culture of shopping. Up to three thirds of Slovaks visit a shopping centre at least once a month, while the average sum they spend stands at €52, according to the latest survey carried out by the GfK company.

At the moment there are 79 recently established shopping centres - 27 facilities more than in 2009. The number of shop keepers increased by more than 500, the TASR newswire wrote.

The lowest concentration of shopping centres, only 14, is in central Slovakia, while in the east of the country there are currently 16 shopping centres, said Anna Buzinkay, chair of the department of customer goods and retail of GfK.

About 36 percent of shops are selling clothes, which is a decrease by 4 percentage points compared to 2009. On the other hand, there are more stores selling various goods, like bookshops, drugstores, pharmacies, toy shops, and florists, Buzinkay told TASR.

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