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Konvergencie festival wraps up the cultural summer

The festival of chamber music – which not only celebrates classical music but aims to broaden its influence by fusing it with other genres and styles – has become an end-of-summer event to look forward to in Bratislava.

The festival of chamber music – which not only celebrates classical music but aims to broaden its influence by fusing it with other genres and styles – has become an end-of-summer event to look forward to in Bratislava.

The Konvergencie / Convergences Festival, entering its 13th year, will take place between September 17 and 23, but an early taster is scheduled for September 5, in the form of the opening of an exhibition of works by Milan Adamčiak including a concert of the Veni Ensemble called Something for Cage, celebrating the experimental musician’s 100th anniversary. The event starts at 19:00 in the design factory in Bottova 3 and admission is free.

Other concerts will feature a host of excellent musicians and musical fusions (e.g. Quasars Ensemble, Igor Krško, Ronald Šebesta, Nora Škutová and others, as well as The Hillard Ensemble from Britain, Israeli violist Yuval Gotlibovich and Austrian violinist Benjamin Schmidt); and music by different composers – Alexander Albrecht and Paul Hindemith, Sofia Gubajdulina, and the later works of Beethoven. The festival, whose founder Jozef Lupták is a cellist himself who performs at it every year, also includes a literary project, a concert for children and a silent movie screening.

Konvergencie will culminate on September 23 when the legendary album Zelená pošta / Green Post by legendary Slovak rock band Collegium musicum will be performed live for the first time since its release in 1972. The full programme can be found at www.konvergencie.sk.

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