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Roughly 115,000 attended SIAF air show

Approximately 115,000 people came to the Slovak International Air Fest (SIAF) 2012 air show that took place on September 1-2 at Sliač airport. Visitors had the chance to see around 100 aircrafts and helicopters from 14 countries, the SITA newswire reported on August 2.

Approximately 115,000 people came to the Slovak International Air Fest (SIAF) 2012 air show that took place on September 1-2 at Sliač airport. Visitors had the chance to see around 100 aircrafts and helicopters from 14 countries, the SITA newswire reported on August 2.

“Today’s weather was brilliant and we can say that the event was very well managed by the police, as well as by the organisers and by all who supervised [the course of the air show],” said Peter Hajnala, spokesperson for SIAF, as quoted by SITA.

The organisers prepared a seven-hour programme for visitors who came to watch the show on both days. The most popular attractions were the US bomber B-52, the Russian fighter MiG-29 M2, the performance of Italian acrobats from Frecce Tricolori and the simulated air combat between two Slovak MiG-29 fighter planes.

Moreover, people could also witness a low fly-over by a US Boeing C-17 Globmaster III, which was heading from Hungary to Poland, Hajnala told the TASR newswire.

“Its crew made use of our air show and showed up with their machine,” he added.

Source: SITA, TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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