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OĽaNO to discuss its future political status

The parliamentary movement Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO) is expected to decide on its future status at an upcoming session of its parliamentary caucus in September, OĽaNO MP Jozef Viskupič said on Monday, September 3.

The parliamentary movement Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO) is expected to decide on its future status at an upcoming session of its parliamentary caucus in September, OĽaNO MP Jozef Viskupič said on Monday, September 3.

The TASR newswire quoted Viskupič as saying three alternatives concerning the movement's status will be discussed. One option is for the 'political movement' to retain the status quo. Another is to transform the loose grouping of independent personalities into a regular political party, with a more solid institutional and organisational structure. The third could be a compromise in the form of appointing coordinators in each of the 79 Slovak districts to supervise the movement's activities in relation to regional and local elections.

One person in favour of a transformation is MP Alojz Hlina, who conceded that he will leave OĽaNO unless it changes its status to a political party. He also admitted that he would be willing to support some sort of hybrid form of a party. Conversely, OĽaNO leader Igor Matovič wants to preserve the independent status of the members, and he criticised Hlina's statements.

Viskupič believes that the MPs will reach a reasonable compromise at the caucus session. He said that he cannot forecast the results of the discussion and conceded that a vote might be necessary. "I don't think that a transformation into a regular political party will be agreed on. Our ambition is to have a functional and operative model that won't destroy the aspect of independence," said Viskupič.(The question of transforming the party's status from a movement into a regular political party has emerged with respect to the upcoming elections to the country's eight regional governments set for 2014, TASR wrote.)

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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