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Two thirds of Slovaks would consent to using Slovak crown, koruna, again

As many as two thirds of Slovaks would consent to the reintroduction of the Slovak koruna if Slovakia had the option of reverting from the euro to its original currency, according to a survey published at the beginning of September by NMS Market Research SR agency.

As many as two thirds of Slovaks would consent to the reintroduction of the Slovak koruna if Slovakia had the option of reverting from the euro to its original currency, according to a survey published at the beginning of September by NMS Market Research SR agency.

The survey showed that only some 50 percent of Slovak adults would like to retain the common European currency, while approximately 12 percent do not care what currency they use, and 7 percent refrained from answering.

"What's surprising is that while as many as around 50 percent of young people aged 18-25 would like to return to the Slovak koruna, the figure decreases in the older categories," NMS Market Research SR account manager Mária Havraníková told the TASr newswire. While 37 percent of women were in favour of reintroducing the Slovak koruna, 59 percent of males wanted to continue to use the euro. The Slovak koruna was the official currency in Slovakia between 1993 and 2008. The euro, Europe’s common currency, was adopted as of January 1, 2009.

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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