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New political party founded

A new party announced its establishment, called Coalition of Citizens of Slovakia - Koalícia občanov Slovenska, KOS on Thursday, September 13.

A new party announced its establishment, called Coalition of Citizens of Slovakia - Koalícia občanov Slovenska, KOS on Thursday, September 13.

As its head Stanislav Martinčko told the SITA newswire that their goals are to listen to people, to not lie, to not steal from the public, and to not create debt. The Košice-based party was registered on June 7, 2012, and it emerged spontaneously, from the initiative of citizens. None of its members have ever belonged to any other party, Martinčko said.

So far, the party has no structure but its ambition is to be able to help citizens and to build the party from the grassroots level in towns, districts and regions. As for political orientation, Martinčko said they consider themselves somewhere in the centre of the political spectrum, leaning more to the right; but he added that the division of parties into right and left is outdated.

(Source: SITA)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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