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HISTORY TALKS...

Vineyards much in demand

ONE OF the first written records of the municipality of Suchá nad Parnou has been preserved thanks to a conflict between two parsons. Pelegrin, from Suchá nad Parnou, and Michal, from Dolné Orešany, argued about which of the two parishes was superior. A court decided in favour of Pelegrin, thus ending the dispute.

ONE OF the first written records of the municipality of Suchá nad Parnou has been preserved thanks to a conflict between two parsons. Pelegrin, from Suchá nad Parnou, and Michal, from Dolné Orešany, argued about which of the two parishes was superior. A court decided in favour of Pelegrin, thus ending the dispute.

The village of Suchá nad Parnou lies not far from Trnava, in a wine-growing region of the Small Carpathians. Names of the most popular localities reveal that wine was grown on elevated plots:
Ružová hora (Rose Mountain), Vlčia hora (Wolf’s Mountain) and Mladý vrch (Young Hill). Each wine-growing territory nominated its own administrator, who in some places was given the German title Bergmeister (Hill-Master), or Magister Montium, but was most commonly called Pereg.

Most of the vineyards in Suchá belonged to burghers from Trnava. As in the Middle Ages, wine-making was highly profitable, and a competitive environment meant that hostility between different vineyards was not uncommon. Owners of estates from Červený Kameň, Svätý Jur and Modra plotted so many obstacles for the Trnavans during wine production that King Ludwig I got involved and admonished the nobility of the region for its involvement in the conflict.

The quality and attractiveness of the vineyards in Suchá nad Parnou is proven by the fact that powerful political players from the surrounding estates maintained a presence, in one way or another, in the local vineyard territories. Counts Ján Pálffy and Martin Czobor of Ostrý Kameň had stone vineyard houses built there.

In this postcard from 1938, St Martin’s Church can be seen - a direct witness to the above-mentioned dispute between the parsons.

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