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Slovaks are satisfied with the EU, but many do not support bailouts, survey shows

Even though Slovaks belong to the group of nations that praises their membership in the European Union the most, they are not very happy about providing financial assistance to other countries, according to the survey called ‘Trans-Atlantic Trends’, carried out by the German Marshall Fund. The main reason is because of their own poverty as well as the statements made by certain politicians, the TASR newswire reported on September 16.

Even though Slovaks belong to the group of nations that praises their membership in the European Union the most, they are not very happy about providing financial assistance to other countries, according to the survey called ‘Trans-Atlantic Trends’, carried out by the German Marshall Fund. The main reason is because of their own poverty as well as the statements made by certain politicians, the TASR newswire reported on September 16.

Up to 54 percent of Slovaks claim they feel positive over the membership of their country in the EU. This figure is the highest among 12 states that participated in the survey. On the other hand, only 31 percent of Slovaks support the contributions to the EU bailout mechanisms, compared to 60 percent recorded in Romania or Sweden.

“The positive view that Slovaks have of the eurozone is due to the fact that the country’s entry to the EU brought positive effects for our economy that have also been felt by ordinary people,” said sociologist Oľga Gyárfášová from the Institute for Public Affairs (IVO), as quoted by TASR.

The survey also showed that as many as 83 percent of Slovaks suppose that the economic crisis has affected the quality of their lives. A similar number of those polled believe that the economic system of the country is unfair, with corruption and cronyism benefitting only a few people.

“The prevailing feeling that the differences between people are unfair because they appear due to the inequality of changes surely contributes to [the fact] that the sense and willingness to solidarity weakens,” Gyárfášová added.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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