Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Czechs and Slovaks want ancient Great Moravian sites on UNESCO list

The Slovak and Czech culture ministries on Monday, September 17, signed a joint proposal to nominate two sites of Great Moravia - the Slavonic fortified settlement in Mikulčice (Czech Republic) and the Church of St. Margaret of Antioch in Kopšany (Trnava region of Slovakia) - for inclusion on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

The Slovak and Czech culture ministries on Monday, September 17, signed a joint proposal to nominate two sites of Great Moravia - the Slavonic fortified settlement in Mikulčice (Czech Republic) and the Church of St. Margaret of Antioch in Kopšany (Trnava region of Slovakia) - for inclusion on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

The territory where the sites are located stretches over the borders of the Czech and Slovak Republics. The two are the most preserved immovable sites from the early Middle Ages in the Slavonic state known as Great Moravia (in existence at the turn of the 9th and 10th centuries), whose founders were believed to be the ancestors of the Czechs and Slovaks. Its imperial city was Nitra.

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Surcharges for night, weekend and holiday work will go up in two phases

Social partners agree upon a compromise solution.

Giving a voice to those unheard

The Sme daily celebrates 25 years since its founding. It is of immense importance that it remains independent and free, writes its editor-in-chief.

Royal chocolate made by Slovak Photo

Some of the chocolate art pieces are decorated with gold or silver.

Veľký Rozsutec is open, just don´t forget your climbing irons Photo

One of the most photogenic mountains in the Malá Fatra range is open in the winter, too.

Veľký Rozsutec, a photo from the mountain top.