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Transport info system approved

A NATIONAL System of Transport Information should be set up in the future in Slovakia, after parliament on September 18 approved a Transport Ministry-sponsored bill on intelligent transport systems.

A NATIONAL System of Transport Information should be set up in the future in Slovakia, after parliament on September 18 approved a Transport Ministry-sponsored bill on intelligent transport systems.

The system will be able to collect information on the number of cars, accidents and traffic jams. The information will then be passed on to police, emergency systems and drivers.

The estimated maximum cost for the introduction of the system is €150 million, of which €120 million should come from EU funds and €30 million from the state budget, the TASR newswire reported.

It is, however, premature to speculate when the system will be introduced and what the actual cost will be, Transport Minister Ján Počiatek said, as reported by TASR.

The bill is pursuant to a European directive that provides a framework for the introduction of intelligent transport systems.

Several MPs voiced their concern that the system might be misused for snooping.

Ordinary People and Independent Personalities MP Alojz Hlina recently organised a protest in Bratislava, claiming that the bill paves the way for the introduction of electronic road tolls for passenger cars. The Transport Ministry denies this.

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