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OĽaNO declares war on nudity in Slovak daily press

Opposition party Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO) is set to launch a campaign against erotic images appearing in the daily press by submitting a law to ban them from newspaper pages, OĽaNO MP Branislav Škripek said on Thursday, September 27.

Opposition party Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO) is set to launch a campaign against erotic images appearing in the daily press by submitting a law to ban them from newspaper pages, OĽaNO MP Branislav Škripek said on Thursday, September 27.

"We're endlessly flooded by damaging and misguided depictions of human nudity, with the perception of women being warped as a result. On the one hand, we as a society promote these things, but then there is a group of people who find this worrying and annoying, particularly parents of children and young people," explained Škripek, as quoted by the TASR newswire. Therefore, the movement plans to submit an amendment to the Children and Youth Morality Protection Act and launch a petition for people who want to express their dismay over the content of print media.

The amendment will be drafted with the aim of banning “obscene display” of the human body in all publications not explicitly categorised as erotic. Škripek rejects the notion that this would amount to censorship. When asked what he meant exactly by the term 'erotic content', the lawmaker replied that a strict definition is not possible. "The display of human nakedness and sexuality in a way that is devoid of content ... now that's something we can lean on. A purposeless provoking of arousal, an attempt to use nudity to sell a product – that represents the barbarisation of society," he stressed.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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