Malinová won’t be sent to hospital

DOCTORS will not be able to forcibly hospitalise Hedviga Malinová Žáková in order to investigate what her mental condition might have been during an attack which allegedly took place in 2006, according to a ruling by the Nitra Regional Court, the Sme daily reported.

DOCTORS will not be able to forcibly hospitalise Hedviga Malinová Žáková in order to investigate what her mental condition might have been during an attack which allegedly took place in 2006, according to a ruling by the Nitra Regional Court, the Sme daily reported.

The judges dismissed an appeal filed by prosecutor Jaroslav Kozolka, who had argued that examination of Žáková at an outpatient clinic would be insufficient.

“I did not expect any other ruling from the court,” said the public rights defender, Jana Dubovcová, as quoted by Sme.

The prosecutor turned to the court after Malinová refused to talk to a psychiatrist at an outpatient clinic, the TASR newswire reported, adding that Malinová’s attorney Roman Kvasnica insisted that she would not be interviewed as a charged person, and would not be forced to do so even if the interviewer were a psychiatrist.

Žáková, née Malinová, a Hungarian-speaking Slovak citizen, reported that she had been assaulted on her way to a university exam in Nitra in August 2006. The police concluded their investigation in September 2006 with the finding that no attack had actually occurred. The announcement was made at a press conference by then-interior minister Robert Kaliňák and then-prime minister Robert Fico, at which Kaliňák said that “it is beyond doubt that the case did not happen”, supporting his assertion with several pieces of what he claimed were evidence, including DNA samples.

Kaliňák later went on to denounce Malinová as a “pathological liar”.

In May 2007 Malinová was charged with lying to police and making false claims but her case has never been presented before a court.

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