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Hundreds gather for the “Good Market”

On Saturday, September 15, Panenská Street in downtown Bratislava hosted the Good Market / Dobrý trh for the last time this year. From 10:00 to 16:00, hundreds of people came to enjoy the cultural programme, pick up old books from second-hand stalls, taste exotic and artisanal delicacies, or simply bump into friends and acquaintances.

Good Market - Dobrý trh in September. (Source: Sme - Gabriel Kuchta)

On Saturday, September 15, Panenská Street in downtown Bratislava hosted the Good Market / Dobrý trh for the last time this year. From 10:00 to 16:00, hundreds of people came to enjoy the cultural programme, pick up old books from second-hand stalls, taste exotic and artisanal delicacies, or simply bump into friends and acquaintances.

Like the previous Good Markets, this one, the fourth of its kind in 2012, was organised by the Punkt civic association in collaboration with the Staré mesto / Old Town borough of Bratislava. Representatives of the Old Town opened a “Good Office” during the market, where the mayor of the borough, Tatiana Rosová, listened to complaints from about 30 citizens. Most of the grievances involved the new parking policy in the Old Town, which was introduced this summer, the SITA newswire wrote.

Other attractions at the event included culinary, literary, artistic, and linguistic demonstrations of Mexican culture, and a photo-marathon, while The Evangelical Church in Panenská opened its garden for locals and put on workshops and puppet theatre especially for children. Elsewhere, the civic association Domov použitých kníh / The Home of Used Books, which collects old books from people and institutions, supplied the market with 2,000 books that were available for free that day, and took donations of unwanted books from the public.

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