Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Residential property prices fell by 2 percent in 2011

The prices of residential property shrank by 2 percent last year on an annual basis, but a more pronounced drop was seen in some other European Union member countries, analysts from Poštová Banka told the TASR newswire on Monday, October 1.

The prices of residential property shrank by 2 percent last year on an annual basis, but a more pronounced drop was seen in some other European Union member countries, analysts from Poštová Banka told the TASR newswire on Monday, October 1.

"A much steeper, double-digit fall in the prices of flats and houses was seen in Romania (14.3 percent) and Ireland (14 percent)," said the bank, citing figures from Eurostat. Analysts pointed to so-called ghost houses in Ireland, where 300,000 out of more than half a million houses and flats built during the real estate boom are now vacant. Spain is experiencing similar problems, with their property prices dropping by 7.4 percent in 2011 year-on-year. On the other hand, the prices of residential property went up in France and Luxembourg - by 6 and 4.2 percent, respectively.

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

The Nordic walker with the best technique in the world is Slovak Photo

For Lucia Okoličányová, Nordic walking has become her love of life and philosophy

Lucia Okoličányová

Pro-EU voters vote for anti-EU governments

This phenomenon is no longer limited to Central Europe.

Hungarian and foreign students took to the streets of Budapest to support CEU.

Planes will steal the sky above Dubová

Visitors should expect a colourful programme full of acrobatic demonstrations and tourist flights at the airport in Dubová, close to Bratislava.

Sulík: Kiska's party would only further break the centre right

Fico's star is falling and he could still save himself now for another election term, says opposition SaS leader Richard Sulík about who would benefit from early elections.

Richard Sulik