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Harnessing the sun

THERE are now photovoltaic power stations with an aggregate installed capacity of 512 MW operating in Slovakia. Last year they generated 310 GWh of electricity, about 1.1 percent of the electricity produced nationwide, the Economy Ministry reported in early September, the SITA newswire wrote.

THERE are now photovoltaic power stations with an aggregate installed capacity of 512 MW operating in Slovakia. Last year they generated 310 GWh of electricity, about 1.1 percent of the electricity produced nationwide, the Economy Ministry reported in early September, the SITA newswire wrote.

“Even though the annual share of electricity production by solar power stations is relatively small, the contribution of their production during the summer is not negligible when covering the country’s load,” the ministry noted. The total immediate output of solar power stations reached about 300 MW in the summer. “During the summer, with the load at 2,500 MW, this is about 12 percent.”

The ministry further reiterated that solar power stations, given their dependence on the availability of sunshine, require additional reserve generating capacity and precise prediction of their likely output, based on the weather, is of high importance.

Topic: Industry


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