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OSCE high commissioner visits

PRIME Minister Robert Fico still harbours the conviction that the issue of dual Slovak-Hungarian citizenship needs to be addressed through an international agreement, despite Hungary repeatedly rejecting several Slovak proposals.

PRIME Minister Robert Fico still harbours the conviction that the issue of dual Slovak-Hungarian citizenship needs to be addressed through an international agreement, despite Hungary repeatedly rejecting several Slovak proposals.

“Slovakia will surely protect its national interests,” he claimed, as quoted by the SITA newswire, after his meeting with Knut Vollebaek, the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) high commissioner on national minorities, who visited Slovakia on October 10 and 11.

During his talks with the OSCE high commissioner, Fico discussed the standing of national minorities in Slovakia and related issues, such as the controversy surrounding János Selye University in Komárno, a Hungarian university that failed to meet requirements to retain its university status.

During his visit, Vollebaek also met several ministers and visited southern parts of Slovakia that have a large proportion of Hungarian-speaking inhabitants.

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