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Inland waterways study with OECD

THE OBJECTIVE of the Danube Axis case study is to identify opportunities for development of transportation infrastructure on the Danube water route. The project was officially launched at a seminar of the OECD about the future of port cities, which took place in Paris, where the OECD is based, on September 14, the Slovak Foreign Ministry reported on its website.

THE OBJECTIVE of the Danube Axis case study is to identify opportunities for development of transportation infrastructure on the Danube water route. The project was officially launched at a seminar of the OECD about the future of port cities, which took place in Paris, where the OECD is based, on September 14, the Slovak Foreign Ministry reported on its website.

The Danube Axis is a project by Slovakia and the OECD, coordinated by the Slovak Ministry of Transport, Construction and Regional Development. It will pay special attention to opportunities for development of inland ports in Bratislava, Komárno and Štúrovo, and for development of water transport on the Danube, Morava and Váh rivers for carmakers in Slovakia, like the Slovak arm of the German carmaker Volkswagen in Bratislava’s Devínska Nová Ves, Trnava-based PSA Peugeot Citroën and the Žilina-based Kia Motors Slovakia.

The realisation of recommendations by the OECD will contribute to the removal of obstacles and differences in usage of the potential of inland water transport between the western and eastern regions of Europe, the Slovak Foreign Affairs Ministry wrote on its website. The case study is expected to be published during the first half of 2013.

Topic: Transport


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