Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

COOKING WITH AMBASSADORS

Japanese recipes: Turnip and spinach soup

Ingredients: 2 litres of water, 20g of hondashi (instant fish soup stock), 1 large turnip, 200g of spinach, 1 carrot, lemon peel, soy sauce, mirin (sweet rice wine).

Ingredients: 2 litres of water, 20g of hondashi (instant fish soup stock), 1 large turnip, 200g of spinach, 1 carrot, lemon peel, soy sauce, mirin (sweet rice wine).

Preparation: Boil the instant hondashi stock in 2 litres of water and set aside. (For home-made hondashi, add 40g of kombu (edible kelp) to 2 litres of water and after 10 minutes of slow cooking, increase the heat until the kombu becomes soft. Just before the water begins boiling vigorously remove the kombu.) Add 0.5 litres of water and bring the broth to boil again. Add kezurigatsuo (bonito fish flakes) when boiling and then remove from the heat. Let the bonito flakes sink to the bottom for 1 minute, then strain the stock through a sieve or towel and discard the flakes. Put the turnip, peeled and cut into four similar-sized pieces, into a pot and cover with hondashi fish broth. Cook until tender then add mirin and soy sauce. Add parboiled spinach to the mixture of hondashi fish broth, mirin and soy sauce. Arrange the vegetables in bowls, then top up with fish broth and garnish with lemon peel.

Top stories

Slovaks drink less and less

Behind the decline in alcohol consumption is, for example, the abandoning of the habit of drinking at work – typical especially during communism, according to an expert.

Kiska: Even Europe has its aggressive neighbour

President Andrej Kiska addressed UN commenting poverty, instability and climate change.

President Andrej Kiska

Arca Capital enters the banking sector

Czech and Slovak financial group acquires a majority share in Austrian private bank Wiener Privatbank.

Bank, illustrative stock photo

Ryanair cancels some flights from and to Bratislava

The Irish low-cost airline publishes full list of cancellations

Irish budget airline Ryanair is believed to be cancelling up to 50 flights every day over the next six weeks because it "messed up" its pilots' holiday schedules.