Bratislava Airport handled close to 800,000 travellers over the summer

Nearly 800,000 people passed through Bratislava's M.R. Štefánik Airport (BTS) during this year's summer season, using 27 regular and 40 charter flight routes to and from the airport, the TASR newswire reported on Thursday, October 25.

Nearly 800,000 people passed through Bratislava's M.R. Štefánik Airport (BTS) during this year's summer season, using 27 regular and 40 charter flight routes to and from the airport, the TASR newswire reported on Thursday, October 25.

"We were down 60,000 people this summer," said BTS business director Tomáš Kika when comparing the latest figures with those for summer 2011. As regards scheduled flights, the greatest interest was shown in flights to London (nearly 116,000 passengers), followed by Dublin (35,000) and Milan (28,000). Ryanair came top among the air carriers, with 356,000 travellers, followed by Norwegian Air Shuttle (15,000) and UTair Aviation (12,000). When it comes to charter flights, Antalya in Turkey (100,000) turned out to be the most popular destination, followed by the Bulgarian city of Burgas (50,000) and the Tunisian city of Monastir (33,000). Travel Service (281,000), Sayegh Aviation Europe (26,000) and Bulgarian Air Charter (15,000) were the most widely used operators of charter flights.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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