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Number of hate crimes in 2011 highest in five years

More than half of the total of 242 extremist and racially motivated criminal acts in 2011 have not been solved, states an Interior Ministry report on meeting the tasks set by the Concept for Combating Extremism, which was acknowledged by the cabinet at its session on Wednesday, October 31.

More than half of the total of 242 extremist and racially motivated criminal acts in 2011 have not been solved, states an Interior Ministry report on meeting the tasks set by the Concept for Combating Extremism, which was acknowledged by the cabinet at its session on Wednesday, October 31.

Meanwhile, the total number of hate crimes committed in 2011 (242) represents more than double the figure seen in 2010, when 114 such crimes were committed. In addition, the figure recorded in 2011 is the highest in the past five years.

The TASR newswire quoted the report as stating that 2011, along with the first six months of 2012, saw an increase in extremist demonstrations. Most of these protests - along with hate-fuelled behaviour in general - were organised or spread via the internet, with themes aimed at drawing the interest of supporters of both ends of the political spectrum, including 'anti-gypsyism', criticism of the social system, and cases covered by the media.

In addition, the report cautions that Slovak extremists have moved on from anonymous demonstrations via participation in civil associations all the way to politics. In order to achieve their goals, they have usually taken advantage of problems concerning socially disadvantaged and “inadaptable” communities. "When pointing to a certain problem, they [the organisers] intentionally take advantage of the frustrations of local people,” reads the report, referring to nationalist organisation Slovenská Pospolitosť (Slovak Togetherness), which was active throughout Slovakia last year. Trenčín Region saw the highest number of hate crimes, with almost 20 percent of the total number of such crimes committed there.

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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