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Roma reform turns to justice

THE STATE should respond to the continuous criminal activities of people who receive social benefits, according to the authors of the Roma reform titled “The Right Way”, who have presented its second part, dedicated to law enforcement, the SITA newswire reported on November 16.

THE STATE should respond to the continuous criminal activities of people who receive social benefits, according to the authors of the Roma reform titled “The Right Way”, who have presented its second part, dedicated to law enforcement, the SITA newswire reported on November 16.

“For those who continuously violate the laws we will have to prepare measures that will change the form or amount of individual benefits that they receive from the state,” said Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák, as quoted by SITA.

One of the statements, on which the reform is based, is that as a result of the current legal state, crimes committed by socially-dependent people go unpunished when they do not have enough money to pay the fines. Such a situation might be partly resolved by limiting the benefits received for “material needs”.

The authors of the Roma reform also propose employing people who owe money to their local municipalities for specific jobs as a way of enabling them to pay off their debt, saying that only people who are “responsible” should be allowed to actually earn money for their work.

The third problem identified by the authors of the reform is the fact that the system does not protect teachers from aggressive behaviour by pupils or their parents, which discourages teachers from teaching children from “problematic” environments.

In response, the reform proposes to modify the form and amount of social benefits received by families based on the behaviour of their children at school.

The remaining four parts of the Roma reform have yet to be presented.

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