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Some companies will have to buy their CO2 emission quotas next year

The Slovak Parliament on Wednesday, November 28, approved a new system of providing CO2 emissions quotas which will require some companies – especially those operating in the sphere of electricity production – to pay for all of their quotas, while allocating the rest to manufacturing companies for free.

The Slovak Parliament on Wednesday, November 28, approved a new system of providing CO2 emissions quotas which will require some companies – especially those operating in the sphere of electricity production – to pay for all of their quotas, while allocating the rest to manufacturing companies for free.

The TASR newswire quoted Environment Minister Peter Žiga as saying that the law, which was approved via fast-tracked legislative proceedings and is due to come into effect as of January 2013, should bring around €105 million into state coffers next year. The volume of available quotas for 2013 is 32.2 million tons, half of which will be sold by auction and the other half redistributed by the government.

The Environment Ministry says it plans to help the most polluting industries by providing loans or grants aimed at purchasing environmentally friendly technologies.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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