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Former prime minister Vladimír Mečiar to publish his memoirs

Vladimír Mečiar, who served as Slovak prime minister three times (between 1990 and 1991, 1992 and 1994, 1994 and 1998) says he has recovered government documents that he kept deliberately hidden for eight years and will now write his memoirs, the TASR newswire reported.

Vladimír Mečiar, who served as Slovak prime minister three times (between 1990 and 1991, 1992 and 1994, 1994 and 1998) says he has recovered government documents that he kept deliberately hidden for eight years and will now write his memoirs, the TASR newswire reported.

Mečiar said the first part of his planned memoir would be published immediately after it was completed, but that the second part would be published only posthumously.

The seventy-year-old former premier also said that he might consider re-entering Slovak politics, commenting that the country is not going in the right direction. His party received less than 1 percent of the vote in this year's general election.

The controversial former prime minister has been portrayed in a less than flattering light in other people's memoirs. Hillary Clinton, in her book 'Living History', which recounts her experiences as US First Lady during her husband Bill's presidency in the 1990s, famously described a meeting with Mečiar at which she was "appalled at his bullying attitude and barely controlled rage".

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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