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Police in Bratislava arrested internationally wanted Moldovan

Police officers from Bratislava tracked down and arrested a 36-year-old Moldovan national wanted under a European arrest warrant. The man was sentenced by a Czech court in 2008 to five years in prison for committing 12 crimes, involving mainly robberies from flats and cars, the TASR newswire reported on December 31.


Police officers from Bratislava tracked down and arrested a 36-year-old Moldovan national wanted under a European arrest warrant. The man was sentenced by a Czech court in 2008 to five years in prison for committing 12 crimes, involving mainly robberies from flats and cars, the TASR newswire reported on December 31.

“The police engaged in the action based on information concerning his [the Moldovan’s] probable location in Slovakia,” said spokesperson for the Police Presidium Michal Slivka, as quoted by TASR.

It turned out that the man, arrested on Majerníková Street, had a Romanian identification card issued in a different name.

“The authenticity of the document is being examined by the International Police Co-operation Office,” added Slivka.

If the document is found to be fake, the Moldovan will face other charges for forging official documents.

Moreover, the man is now waiting to be extradited to the Czech Republic, TASR wrote.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Spectator staff from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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