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Harabin collapses at Vienna Airport

The president of the Slovakia’s Supreme Court, Štefan Harabin, experienced sudden health problems while at Vienna International Airport on January 8 and paramedics had to be summoned, before he was rushed to hospital. His health condition was later reported to be stable, and he was moved to a hospital in Bratislava, the TASR newswire reported.

The president of the Slovakia’s Supreme Court, Štefan Harabin, experienced sudden health problems while at Vienna International Airport on January 8 and paramedics had to be summoned, before he was rushed to hospital. His health condition was later reported to be stable, and he was moved to a hospital in Bratislava, the TASR newswire reported.

Harabin had been planning to fly to Chile to attend a meeting of supreme court chairs from a number of European countries. He was travelling with a delegation of Slovak judges including his wife Gabriela and Judge Jana Baricová. However, shortly before boarding the plane Harabin fell ill and then collapsed. He was taken to hospital in Vienna with a suspected stroke, concussion and broken ribs.

Harabin has a history of high blood pressure. In October 2012 he underwent a hip operation after which he was unable to work for several months. He returned to work only this month, the Sme.sk website wrote.

Sources: TASR, Sme.sk

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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