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TV station for men launched

CME, the provider of the most popular TV station in Slovakia, Markíza, launched a new TV station in late August. The name of the male-focused station is Dajto, which loosely translated means ‘Go for it’. This is the third TV station CME operates in Slovakia. In 2009 it launched the TV station Doma (Home), which it describes as focusing on active women.

CME, the provider of the most popular TV station in Slovakia, Markíza, launched a new TV station in late August. The name of the male-focused station is Dajto, which loosely translated means ‘Go for it’. This is the third TV station CME operates in Slovakia. In 2009 it launched the TV station Doma (Home), which it describes as focusing on active women.

For the time being there are eight TV stations in Slovakia. The public-service broadcaster RTVS runs two channels, Jednotka and Dvojka, while its third sports channel was launched in 2008, but due to a lack of money it was taken off the air in 2011. CME provides private stations Markíza, Doma and Dajto. TV JOJ launched its second TV station, JOJ Plus, which focuses on family programming, in 2008. There is also a TV news channel, TA3. Czech TV channels are watched in Slovakia regularly, too.

TV JOJ, whose news programmes are of the infotainment character, plans to launch a new station in March to focus on news, documentaries, talk shows and lifestyle. It plans to compete with TA3.

In the Czech Republic, TV companies are not halting their expansion plans even though revenues from advertising are continuing to fall, the E15 daily wrote in early January.

Prima TV will add a documentary channel to its existing three in January or in February. Public-service Czech TV plans to launch a children's channel not earlier than during the second half of 2013.

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