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Slovak film about WWII hero Winton to be screened in US cinemas

A SLOVAK film, Nicky’s Family, will be released in US cinemas on Friday, January 11. The internationally acclaimed documentary movie, made by Matej Mináč and Patrik Pašš, will open in Florida, where the son of Sir Nicholas Winton, the main character, will also attend.

A SLOVAK film, Nicky’s Family, will be released in US cinemas on Friday, January 11. The internationally acclaimed documentary movie, made by Matej Mináč and Patrik Pašš, will open in Florida, where the son of Sir Nicholas Winton, the main character, will also attend.

“Apart from screenings in cinemas and at debates, schools and universities have also asked for the film to be lent,” said Iveta Pospíšilová of the Trigon Production company.

The feature documentary film was made as a co-production by the Slovak and Czech state television broadcasters and the Slovak Audio-Visual Fund, and has won 12 audience awards at US festivals. The film, which is about the actions of Winton, a British citizen who saved the lives of hundreds of Jewish children in Czechoslovakia during World War II, has received 30 prizes in total.

There are also plans to distribute the film in French and Venezuelan cinemas.

“Sir Nicolas Winton, who is over 103 years old, is following all these successes with much interest,” Pospíšilová concluded.

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