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Public Health Office to inspect Polish candy with rat poison

The Public Health Office (ÚVZ) ordered the inspection of all bars and restaurants which could have received Polish confectioneries made from dried milk containing rat poison, the TASR newswire learned from Chief Hygienist Ivan Rovný on Tuesday, January 22. This concerns mostly canteens and cafeterias, even those at schools, as well as snack bars, confectioner's shops and coffee bars, due to a suspicion that they could have purchased the products in question from Slovak vendors or straight from the Polish manufacturer.

The Public Health Office (ÚVZ) ordered the inspection of all bars and restaurants which could have received Polish confectioneries made from dried milk containing rat poison, the TASR newswire learned from Chief Hygienist Ivan Rovný on Tuesday, January 22. This concerns mostly canteens and cafeterias, even those at schools, as well as snack bars, confectioner's shops and coffee bars, due to a suspicion that they could have purchased the products in question from Slovak vendors or straight from the Polish manufacturer.

"Due to the fact that these confectioneries are consumed either on their own or with, for example, ice-cream, they are generally eaten more frequently by children, so it is necessary to pay special attention to the danger at hand," said Rovný. "Therefore, we recommend consumers not to buy these products and if already purchased, not to consume them or, better yet, bring them back for reimbursement."

According to available information, the Polish company Magnolia used dried milk containing rat poison in the making of the following products: Stilla DolceCocoa Rolls 2 x 50g, Vanila wafles, Wafle Max, Poesia Milk Cream and Wiener Eiswaffel. No fatalities have been reported thus far. Low quality of foodstuffs, particularly those imported to the Slovak market from abroad, represents a long-term problem. A scandal emerged in 2012 when it was discovered that some Polish products contained road salt. Many western brand products are sold in the same packaging as on western European markets, but their content is different and often sub-standard.

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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