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TIS: Slovakia earned ‘C’ grade in defence ministry transparency evaluation

The British branch of the Transparency International watchdog made its historically first evaluation of transparency and corruption risks of defence ministries in 82 countries worldwide, within the programme focused on defence and security. It evaluated this sphere mainly due to the fact that corruption in defence is a crucial issue of national and global security.

The British branch of the Transparency International watchdog made its historically first evaluation of transparency and corruption risks of defence ministries in 82 countries worldwide, within the programme focused on defence and security. It evaluated this sphere mainly due to the fact that corruption in defence is a crucial issue of national and global security.

Countries were evaluated via 77 questions from five basic areas in which corruption risks can be expected: politics, finances, human resources, operation management and procurement. Slovakia earned a ‘C’ grade, ranking it among the group of countries with mild corruption risk, the TASR newswire wrote on Tuesday, January 29. The Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Bulgaria, France, Greece, Italy, Latvia and Spain were also included in this group.

Eleven percent of the countries evaluated beat Slovakia in the ranking, while two percent (Australia and Germany) earned an ‘A’ grade, and nine countries received a ‘B’. However, as many as 69 percent of all countries ended up in groups in which the risk of corruption in defence seems high (‘D’ grade), very high (‘E’ grade) or even critical (‘F’ frade). TASR was informed by Riapošová of the Slovak branch, the Transparency International Slovensko.

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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