MPs pass revised amendment to support use of renewable energy

The Slovak Parliament has used a fast-tracked proceeding to pass a slightly revised amendment to the law on support for the use of renewable energy. The ruling Smer party accepted some proposals after the new rules were widely criticised by the opposition, the TASR newswire reported on January 29.

The Slovak Parliament has used a fast-tracked proceeding to pass a slightly revised amendment to the law on support for the use of renewable energy. The ruling Smer party accepted some proposals after the new rules were widely criticised by the opposition, the TASR newswire reported on January 29.

The original version of the amendment contained a rule giving more subsidies to combined-cycle power plants with a capacity of 300MW or less. The opposition claimed that the subsidy was tailored to favour Steam-Gas Cycle (PPC), a plant owned by the Penta financial group.

The authors of the amendment changed the measure, saying that all such power plants, regardless of their capacity, would be able to seek subsidies. Since the current version of the new law does not contain any reference to capacity, the rules will remain unchanged. This means that all power plants with combined-cycle production and a capacity of 200MW or less will be allowed to ask for more money, TASR wrote.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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