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Slovakia gets its own WikiLeaks

THE SLOVAK version of WikiLeaks is now online. Civil activists, in collaboration with the Human Rights Institute, launched the portal on January 26 to mark the first anniversary of the Gorilla protests. On the same day they organised a peaceful protest held in front of the US Embassy to Slovakia, attended by about 30 people, the TASR newswire wrote.

THE SLOVAK version of WikiLeaks is now online. Civil activists, in collaboration with the Human Rights Institute, launched the portal on January 26 to mark the first anniversary of the Gorilla protests. On the same day they organised a peaceful protest held in front of the US Embassy to Slovakia, attended by about 30 people, the TASR newswire wrote.

Slovak translations of diplomatic cables of the US Embassy have appeared on www.wikileaks-slovensko.org, containing correspondence on political, economic and global developments as well as certain details from behind the scenes in Slovak politics.

“The main reason for launching [Slovak] WikiLeaks is our campaign for the closure of the Guantanamo detention centre and the release of Bradley Manning, who probably handed the confidential documents to [Wikileaks founder] Julian Assange,” said Alena Krempaská from the Human Rights Institute, which was one of the organisers of the Gorilla protests held last year. “We wanted to demonstrate to the people of Slovakia what Manning had done, so we translated the key embassy cables that concern Slovakia.”

The activists do not expect the Slovak version of WikiLeaks to provoke the kind of uproar that the original did three years ago. However, they say it will contain translations of cables which the Slovak public has not yet seen, the Pravda daily wrote.

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