Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

FOCUS SHORT

Youth lacks IT education

MORE than 80 percent of Slovaks between the ages of 18 and 26 have experience with commonly available information and telecommunication technologies (ICT). But as many as 40 percent of youths are dissatisfied with how schools have prepared them in this field. This is one of the findings of the digital literacy survey that the Institute of Public Affairs conducted in cooperation with Microsoft.

MORE than 80 percent of Slovaks between the ages of 18 and 26 have experience with commonly available information and telecommunication technologies (ICT). But as many as 40 percent of youths are dissatisfied with how schools have prepared them in this field. This is one of the findings of the digital literacy survey that the Institute of Public Affairs conducted in cooperation with Microsoft.

According to the survey’s results, young people scored 60 percent higher than the average of the population, while they improved their skills in the most commonly available ICTs. But shortcomings persist, for example, in searching for information and data, transferring data and working with databases.

Among young people, students and white collar workers have the highest level of digital skills. They are followed by businesspeople, the self-employed and manual youth. The unemployed and young women on maternity leave demonstrated the lowest level of digital skills.

The survey revealed that schools insufficiently prepare students for using ICT in both everyday life and the labour market, citing insufficient school hours, overly formal teaching of informatics, obsoleteness and ignoring of the latest trends.

“These are serious objections, which should motivate us to change,” said Marián Velšic, analyst with IVO, as quoted by the SITA newswire.

Topic: IT


Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.

Blog: Foreigners, get involved

What about making our voices heard? And not only in itsy-bitsy interviews about traditional cuisine and the High Tatras.

Regional election 2017