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One third of Gorilla investigation team will change

The composition of the team of investigators which is dealing with the Gorilla file will change after its head Marek Gajdoš asked Police Corps President Tibor Gašpar to replace five of its 16 current members, the Sme daily reported on February 20.

The composition of the team of investigators which is dealing with the Gorilla file will change after its head Marek Gajdoš asked Police Corps President Tibor Gašpar to replace five of its 16 current members, the Sme daily reported on February 20.

While two members of the team have health problems which demand long-term treatment, another has got a new job which does not allow him/her to have dual functions. A fourth investigator is moving away from Bratislava, Gajdoš explained.

The last person to leave the team will be the investigator who dealt with the case of former police officer Ján Rejda, who was accused of accepting a bribe from Zoltán Varga in the name of the Penta financial group, Sme wrote.

Gašpar promised that the police will substitute the departing investigators with exactly the same number of new staff.

Earlier in the year, former guarantor of the team of investigators, Rudolf Cádra, left his post after he was reclassified as an ordinary police officer, Sme wrote.

“I was expecting the team to change or split since at the highest levels there is no will to investigate the case,” said former interior minister Daniel Lipšic, as quoted by Sme.

The Gorilla file is an unverified document which appeared on the internet at the end of 2011. It contains transcripts of alleged recordings allegedly made by the SIS intelligence agency that purport to describe high-level political corruption in 2005-06. The file led to political upheaval and street protests in the run-up to the March 2012 general election.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
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