Murderer of former VÚJE head Ján Korec lands 14.5-year sentence

A 14.5-year prison sentence has been handed down 12 years after the murder of Ján Korec, the former head of the Research Institute of Nuclear Power Plants in Trnava. His murderer, Ivan Gombík (aged 44), waited for his victim on February 23, 2001, and shot him 30 times. He received Sk100,000 in reward for the killing.

A 14.5-year prison sentence has been handed down 12 years after the murder of Ján Korec, the former head of the Research Institute of Nuclear Power Plants in Trnava. His murderer, Ivan Gombík (aged 44), waited for his victim on February 23, 2001, and shot him 30 times. He received Sk100,000 in reward for the killing.

"The Slovak Supreme Court turned down the appeal of the defendant, Gombík,” head of the court’s panel Igor Burger told the TASR newswire. Gombík was sentenced by the Trnava Regional Court one year ago, but he appealed to the Supreme Court, claiming that he was coerced by police into making a guilty plea. The court did not believe him, as he had already admitted in the past that he shot his victim so many times because he was inexperienced, and he cited his bad life situation as the reason behind the crime.

Trnava businessman Július Polakovič ordered the murder because he borrowed Sk10 million from Korec, and he was supposed to repay it together with interest amounting to Sk1.8 million. Instead, he called his acquaintance, Miroslav Zuba, in January 2001 and offered him Sk500,000 for killing Korec. Zuba agreed, called Eduard Didi, and he called Gombík. Of the half-million reward, Zuba kept Sk130,000; Didi Sk270,000 and Gombík got the rest. The other men involved in the case have already been sentenced: Polakoviča to 14 years, Zuba to 12.5 years and Didi to 10.5 years in prison.

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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