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Interest in low-energy houses rises

An increasing number of Slovaks are looking for new houses that are low-energy. Slovakia’s biggest producer of standardised low-energy houses, Zvolen-based ForDom, has reported a 25-percent annual increase in its sales last year, which totalled €3.5 million. In 2012 it built and delivered 33 low-energy houses, compared to 27 in 2011. More than one third of their sales were exported to Austria, Branislav Kuzma, the marketing director of the company told the TASR newswire.

An increasing number of Slovaks are looking for new houses that are low-energy. Slovakia’s biggest producer of standardised low-energy houses, Zvolen-based ForDom, has reported a 25-percent annual increase in its sales last year, which totalled €3.5 million. In 2012 it built and delivered 33 low-energy houses, compared to 27 in 2011. More than one third of their sales were exported to Austria, Branislav Kuzma, the marketing director of the company told the TASR newswire.

“Our main production programme is the construction of standardised energy-passive family houses [called] ECOCUBE, of which we have built 20 so far,” Kuzma said.

Its advantage, apart from quick construction, is low energy costs amounting to only €40-€60 per month. This sum already includes heating, cooling, water heating and energy for household appliances.

ForDom builds houses from ecologically sustainable materials, especially wood. It uses also adobe bricks, clay plaster and sheep's wool.

Topic: Industry


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