SPECTATOR COLLEGE

Exercise: Finding new uses for old buildings

This exercise is linked to the article: Finding new uses for old buildings.

This exercise is linked to the article: Finding new uses for old buildings.

Reading: Read the Spectator article in class together, instructing students to underline/highlight words they’re not sure about.

Listening: Play the following YouTube video from BBC about Tate Gallery

Speaking:
1. Try to find a similar reconstruction project/unused building in your vicinity.
2. Try to say how you would change its use, or how you would rebuild it to give it a new role.
3. Name some buildings – in Slovakia and abroad – which you know about and which are interesting from an architectural point of view.
4. Talk about the problems of preservation versus rebuilding, and finding new uses for historical buildings.
5. Name one famous Slovak architect or architectural studio, or name one outstanding building which is interesting from an architectural point of view.

This exercise is published as part of Spectator College, a programme created by The Slovak Spectator with the support of Sugarbooks, a distributor of foreign language books.

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