Sme: Italian authorities acknowledged problems with international adoptions

Slovak children could have problems in their new families in Italy, the Sme daily wrote in its Wednesday, February 27, issue. Moreover, in some cases reports on how they are doing have disappeared, as the Italian Commission for Inter-state Adoptions indirectly admitted.

Slovak children could have problems in their new families in Italy, the Sme daily wrote in its Wednesday, February 27, issue. Moreover, in some cases reports on how they are doing have disappeared, as the Italian Commission for Inter-state Adoptions indirectly admitted.

Altogether 255 Slovak children ended up in Italy between 2002 and 2011, Sme wrote. Slovakia began examining Italy’s adoption policies after allegations came to light that two underage sisters had become pregnant after their adoption. This information has yet to be confirmed. Vice president of the commission Daniela Bacchetta dismissed the information, saying that the girls live normal family lives.

Head of the Centre for International Protection of Children and Youth (CIPC) Andrea Císarová travelled to Italy but she was unable to meet with the children and negotiated only with the commission, asking why information on the fate of the children was missing from the files. The CIPC cooperated on adoptions with a private agency called Famiglia e Minori and with a state agency. The private agency – covering most of the adoptions - lost its license back in 2011. Bacchetta claims the private agency was stripped of its license for reasons that having nothing to do with Slovakia.

(Source: Sme)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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