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Slovak municipalities displayed Tibetan flag

Twenty-four Slovak towns and villages displayed the Tibetan flag over the weekend to draw attention to long-term violations of human rights. This event took place for the third time in Slovakia, the Sme daily reported.

Twenty-four Slovak towns and villages displayed the Tibetan flag over the weekend to draw attention to long-term violations of human rights. This event took place for the third time in Slovakia, the Sme daily reported.

Bratislava’s Old Town city district participated in the event by displaying the Tibetan flag on March 10 on the balcony of the office of the district’s mayor, Tatiana Rosová, the TASR newswire reported.

“As we did last year, we have again decided to participate in this world-wide event,” said Rosová, as quoted by TASR, on March 8 when talking about the plan. “I think it is natural to express support for the Tibetans’ fight for human rights with such a symbolic gesture.”

The global event aimed at promoting the idea of a free Tibet originated in the mid-1990s and is traditionally organised on March 10 in commemoration of the anniversary of the uprising against the Chinese occupation of Tibet, when more than 100 people set themselves on fire.

Slovakia first took part in the event in 2010. This year, almost 70 municipalities, individuals, communities and organisations in Slovakia will participate. The event, called ‘Flag for Tibet’ in Slovakia, is organised by the non-government Tibetan Association, TASR wrote.

Source: Sme, TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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