Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Constitutional Court should still be able to decide case despite objections

The decision in the protracted case of President Ivan Gašparovič’s refusal to appoint general-prosecutor-elect Jozef Čentéš should be solved in spite of the many objections against most of the justices of the Constitutional Court who would decide in the case and the objections filed by both sides.

The decision in the protracted case of President Ivan Gašparovič’s refusal to appoint general-prosecutor-elect Jozef Čentéš should be solved in spite of the many objections against most of the justices of the Constitutional Court who would decide in the case and the objections filed by both sides.

The daily Sme quoted the chairperson of the Constitutional Court, Ivetta Macejková, as having admitted “possible procedural complications” on Monday, March 18, but added that this should not render the Constitutional Court ineffective with regard to the case. She did not reveal, however, specifically how the justices would be chosen to rule in the case, given that 11 out of 13 justices have been excluded due to objections from one of the two parties. Currently, two justices remain - Macejková and Marianna Mochnáčová - and panel to decide such cases must have three members.

This situation is unprecedented in the Constitutional Court’s two decade-long history, Sme wrote in its March 19 issue. In these cases, the court must see to it that the balance between an individual’s right to an impartial trial and the principle of banning the refusal of a justice is maintained.
To read more about the case, please go to Gašparovič objects to another two judges

(Source: Sme)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

General Prosecutor filed a motion for the dissolution of ĽSNS

The Slovak Supreme Court received a motion to dissolve the extreme right ĽSNS party founded and led by Marian Kotleba.

Jaromír Čižnár

Russian spies allegedly recruit also Slovaks

They are using martial art clubs in Germany and dozens more in other EU states, in the Western Balkans, and in North America.

Illustrative stock photo

EC scrutinises state aid for Jaguar Photo

There is a question whether the scrutiny may impact the carmaker’s plans to invest in Slovakia.

The construction site of a brand new plant of Jaguar Land Rover near Nitra.

GLOBSEC forum will host guests from 70 countries

The 12th year of the conference will be attended by the highest number of participants in its history.

Slovak President Andrej Kiska gives the opening speech of The Globsec 2016 security conference.