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Gašparovič objects to another two judges

President Ivan Gašparovič lodged an objection against two more constitutional judges, who were to consider the complaint that Jozef Čentéš, who was elected as general prosecutor in June 2011, filed at the end of February. Currently, only two out of 13 justices remain, against whom neither Gašparovič nor Čentéš have filed objections, the Sme daily reported on March 18.

President Ivan Gašparovič lodged an objection against two more constitutional judges, who were to consider the complaint that Jozef Čentéš, who was elected as general prosecutor in June 2011, filed at the end of February. Currently, only two out of 13 justices remain, against whom neither Gašparovič nor Čentéš have filed objections, the Sme daily reported on March 18.

Though the president’s spokesperson Marek Trubač did not specify the names, Sme wrote that the complaint might pertain to justices Ľudmila Gajdošíková and Rudolf Tkáčik, members of the three-member senate who were, together with Constitutional Court President Ivetta Macejková, to decide over Čentéš’ complaint.

Čentéš did not specify what he will do if the court is not be able to decide over his original complaint, Sme reported.

The whole ‘objection war’ began at the beginning of January 2013 when Jozef Čentéš filed an objection to the refusal of Gašparovič to appoint him as general prosecutor. The objection was to be considered by a panel composed of justices Marianna Mochnáčová, Milan Ľalík and Peter Brňák. The panel composed of justices Lajos Mészáros, Sergej Kohut and Juraj Horváth accepted the complaint at the end of January, which resulted in the replacement of Ľalík and Brňák with Ján Luby and Ladislav Orosz.

Gašparovič later objected to both Luby and Orosz. His complaint was to be judged by Mészáros, Kohut and Horváth, but the president lodged another complaint against this panel in mid February. The Constitutional Court then established another panel, composed by justices Rudolf Tkáčik, Ján Auxt and Ľubomír Dobrík, who were to judge the case.

Yet, Čentéš submitted an objection against Auxt and Dobrík at the end of February, which resulted in the case going to another panel of judges, composed of Tkáčik, Gajdošíková and Macejková.

The president has not published any official reason for his objection to the judges of the Constitutional Court. Some constitutional lawyers doubt whether Gašparovič, as an official state representative, should have the right to file objections against members of the senates like a private citizen, Sme wrote.

Source: Sme

For more information about this story please see: Čentéš objects to two more judges

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

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