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Slovaks are conservative investors

ATTITUDES of central and eastern European households towards investment tend to be more conservative, and most financial assets are put into savings accounts or invested in foreign currency, Generali PPF Asset Management wrote in its latest study. Households in Slovakia, Slovenia and the Czech Republic are the most conservative when putting more than 50 percent of their financial assets into savings accounts, or investing it in foreign currency. These countries are followed by Poland with 45 percent and Hungary with 39 percent. The average in the European Monetary Union is 36 percent, the SITA newswire wrote in late January.

ATTITUDES of central and eastern European households towards investment tend to be more conservative, and most financial assets are put into savings accounts or invested in foreign currency, Generali PPF Asset Management wrote in its latest study. Households in Slovakia, Slovenia and the Czech Republic are the most conservative when putting more than 50 percent of their financial assets into savings accounts, or investing it in foreign currency. These countries are followed by Poland with 45 percent and Hungary with 39 percent. The average in the European Monetary Union is 36 percent, the SITA newswire wrote in late January.

Compared with western Europe, investments in mutual funds in central and eastern European countries remain relatively low, even though all monitored countries have been registering an increase since 2004.

Hungary’s households reported the biggest increase in investments in mutual funds, up by 230 percent, followed by Poland with 160-percent growth. Slovenia registered a 100-percent increase. The Czech Republic and Slovakia followed with increases of 65 and 25 percent, respectively.

“In spite of this steep increase over the last eight years we expect further significant growth of investments by households in central and eastern European countries over the next five years,” Michal Valentík from Generali PPF Invest told SITA.

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Topic: Finances and Advisory


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