Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

HISTORY TALKS...

Hieronymites in Piarg

THE CONSTRUCTION of the monastery and church in Štiavnické Bane began on April 15, 1735. It was built by the Hieronymites, a hermetic monastic order known for its contemplative lifestyle.

THE CONSTRUCTION of the monastery and church in Štiavnické Bane began on April 15, 1735. It was built by the Hieronymites, a hermetic monastic order known for its contemplative lifestyle.

The monks were permitted by King Charles VI to come to Piarg – as Štiavnické Bane was formerly known – some time in 1734-35, to engage in pastoral work, thus satisfying the needs of the inhabitants of Piarg and its surrounding areas. Jesuits had served the area in the past, but due to their uncertain situation in much of Europe at that time, miners from the outskirts of the region were often left without a priest and without the chance to attend service.

In spite of financial support from local miners, construction of the monastery progressed very slowly.

The monastery’s budget enabled only 10 to 15 monks to live in Piarg.

In 1773 when the Jesuit order was suppressed, the Hieronymites took over their residence and services in nearby Vindšachta. Piarg’s small group of Hieronymites came to serve roughly 6,700 inhabitants until 1786, when due to an order from Vienna, their monastery in Piarg was abolished.

This postcard dates back to 1936 and is the work of Sergej Protopopov, a famous photographer of the Banská Štiavnica region.

Top stories

Germans will distribute cars from Nitra’s JRL plant

The state-run freight carrier Cargo did not succeed in its bid, but is still discussing the distribution of suborders with the German firm.

Jaguar Land Rover’s construction site

Ministry: Law against puppy farms affects honest breeders

The recently passed law, clamping down on puppy farms will have serious consequences for honest dog breeders and state employees.

Illustrative stock photo.

Mihál leaving SaS

Behind his decision is disagreement with the stances of party chair Richard Sulík.

Jozef Mihál (l) and Richard Sulík (r)

Office space expected to grow

The growing economy and falling unemployment rate create a good environment for the growth of companies already established in Slovakia, but also for the arrival of new ones.

The Zuckermandel project