Sulík and Kollár fail to find common ground

Jozef Kollár, who last month failed in a bid for the leadership of Freedom and Solidarity (SaS), has intimated he may soon leave the opposition party, though he has not done so yet, the Sme daily reported on April 10.

Jozef Kollár, who last month failed in a bid for the leadership of Freedom and Solidarity (SaS), has intimated he may soon leave the opposition party, though he has not done so yet, the Sme daily reported on April 10.

Kollár met the re-elected leader of SaS, Richard Sulík, on April 9, to discuss Kollár’s ten-point plan. However, the two-hour discussion ended without any agreement. Kollár said that his views were utterly incompatible with those of Sulík.

“I fully accept the results of the Prešov Congress and if Richard’s vision of the further direction of the SaS is carried out, I see no place in the party for me,” Kollár said, as quoted by the TASR newswire, adding that he has no intention of getting in the way of how Sulík intends to lead the SaS.

The MP added that he does not plan to create any “platforms” within the SaS, although he did not exclude the possibility of joining other political platforms in other parties. When asked by journalists whether he has received an offer from Radoslav Procházka, a former MP for the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH), to join his future party, Kollár replied that he had “discussed no offers” with Procházka, TASR wrote.

Kollár will decide on his next steps in the coming weeks, and before the May parliamentary session begins, Sme wrote.

Sulík said he is not thrilled by the fact that Kollár is considering leaving the party. He said he got the impression that Kollár has already decided to leave, but said he failed to understand his statement about their opinions being incompatible.

“Eight items out of ten are compatible,” Sulík said, as quoted by TASR, referring to the meeting with Kollár at which they reportedly disagreed over two of Kollár’s ten proposed items.

According to Sme, four or five of its MPs are considering leaving SaS, which might reduce the number of people in the SaS’ parliamentary caucus to six or seven. This might be a problem, since parliamentary rules state that a caucus has to have at least eight members.

Shortly after the election, two members of SAS’ national board, Xaver Gubáš and František Ksenzsigh, announced they would leave the party. Another member of the party, former candidate for the chief post at the Supreme Audit Office (NKÚ) Kamil Krnáč, announced on March 27 that he would leave the party.

Another two members of SaS, former MP Jaroslav Suja and a former employee of the party’s parliamentary office, Michal Nižňan, left the party on April 2.

Sources: TASR, Sme

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

Curfew and closed schools. Slovakia goes into a mild lockdown this weekend

Nationwide testing will follow, accompanied by another curfew.

Nationwide testing - an ambitious plan with an uncertain result

Antigen tests to be used work on patients with symptoms.

Police arrest top special prosecutor, suspected of helping a mafia group

Dušan Kováčik is known for not filing any criminal lawsuits.

State prepared an €100-million injection for tourism

The sector hit hard by the coronavirus crisis should see money at the end of this year.

Illustrative stock photo