Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Rules for public officials’ property disclosures might change

Public officials may have to submit more detailed disclosures of their properties as of next year. In addition to the fact that disclosures will have to be prepared by officials who were not obliged to do so in the past, the documents will also have to provide more detail, the SITA newswire reported on April 12.

Public officials may have to submit more detailed disclosures of their properties as of next year. In addition to the fact that disclosures will have to be prepared by officials who were not obliged to do so in the past, the documents will also have to provide more detail, the SITA newswire reported on April 12.

One of the changes, presented by Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) MP Miroslav Beblavý, as part of the amendment to the law on conflicts of interest, which was prepared by the representatives of all parliamentary parties, will require public officials to reveal the names of banks where they deposited more than €10,000. Moreover, the officials will have to reveal every private gift worth more than €4,000. The law will also specify what can be considered “a gift”.

Another change is that property will also have to be disclosed by the general director of the public-service broadcaster Radio and Television of Slovakia (RTVS), the head of the Financial Administration, the Police Corps president, the head of the state-run social insurer Sociálna Poisťovňa and the Slovak Land Fund, the head of Military Defence Intelligence, the heads of the offices of the president and parliament, as well as the heads of the office of the Judicial Council, Constitutional Court and public defender of rights.

The amendment will also extend the deadline for submitting property disclosures from March 31 to April 30 in order to reduce bureaucracy linked with the sending of additional documents, SITA wrote.

The aim of the amendment to the law on conflicts of interest is to make public officials disclose all of their income. Income will be divided into several categories, and officials will also have to state the type of the income, and include anything that was rented or borrowed.

In addition, the amendment includes fines of one month’s salary for public officials who fail to report their interests. Moreover, if they state any untrue information, they could be hit with a fine of up to three monthly salaries, SITA wrote.

Since it is an amendment to a constitutional law, the new legislation will have to be backed by at least 90 deputies. If the changes pass in parliament, they will come into force on January 1, 2014.

Source: SITA

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Rules for hiring foreigners are simpler. For exceptions

Despite positive changes, employers still point to some barriers preventing more effective and simpler recruitment of foreign workers.

Some problems with Foreigners’ Police continue.

For a Decent Slovakia protests to resume on Friday

After a summer break, organisers of the protests that have drawn masses to Slovakia’s streets stated that their – and the citizens’ – demands are far from being met.

For A Decent Slovakia march on June 22, 2018, in Bratislava.

News isn’t negative because journalists are cynical

The problem is caused by the demand side.

What is it like to study at a foreign college? Students explain to high-schoolers

Some Slovak students who study abroad already have work offers.

Students during the workshop