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Sme: “Kollár group” has left SaS, founded the Liberal Agreement

Five influential members of the opposition Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) have left the party, together with about 75 other members. Jozef Kollár, Juraj Miškov, Daniel Krajcer, Juraj Droba and Martin Chren left SaS on Tuesday, April 16, the Sme daily wrote.

Five influential members of the opposition Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) have left the party, together with about 75 other members. Jozef Kollár, Juraj Miškov, Daniel Krajcer, Juraj Droba and Martin Chren left SaS on Tuesday, April 16, the Sme daily wrote.

Kollár announced the exodus at a press conference in parliament, adding that his and his supporters’ calls for self-reflection within the party had all been in vain. He also explained that the radicalisation of SaS’ policy prompted their departure from the party. Smer also cited Kollár as reproaching party leader Richard Sulík for his “inacceptable style of communication and leading people” and his failure to stick to one’s “manly promise”.

Given that a parliamentary caucus must have at least eight members, and that the departure of Kollár and his supporters has left SaS with six members, the party is expected to be dissolved. Although parliamentary rules do not specify whether a caucus must have eight members at all times, the ruling Smer will not allow an SaS caucus, Sme wrote.

Kollár announced the foundation of the Liberal Agreement, a new civic association uniting outgoing SaS members. He does not exclude the possibility of a new party evolving from the civic association over the course of time. Kollár also confirmed informal negotiations with other politicians, like Radoslav Procházka and Daniel Lipšic. However, he does not rule out a possible re-unification with SaS and Sulík in 2016, as they share the same values and differ only in terms of their political approach.

The SaS’ press department informed Sme that the Kollár group did the right thing, accepting the appeal of Sulík to leave the party and end the conflict within the party that was distracting attention away from the country’s real problems, Sme wrote.

(Source: Sme)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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