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Government approves €8 million to fix potholes throughout Slovakia

Municipalities throughout Slovakia will be given a total of €8 million to fix potholes that have emerged on roads in recent weeks, according to a cabinet decision on Wednesday, April 17. The two largest cities in Slovakia, Bratislava and Košice, will receive significantly more than originally planned, with Bratislava set to be allocated €1.3 million instead €308,000, and Košice €700,000 instead of €138,500.

Municipalities throughout Slovakia will be given a total of €8 million to fix potholes that have emerged on roads in recent weeks, according to a cabinet decision on Wednesday, April 17. The two largest cities in Slovakia, Bratislava and Košice, will receive significantly more than originally planned, with Bratislava set to be allocated €1.3 million instead €308,000, and Košice €700,000 instead of €138,500.

"The remaining €6 million will be distributed among other towns and villages throughout Slovakia depending on the length of the road stretches they are responsible for," said Finance Minister Peter Kažimír, as quoted by the TASR newswire. He added that the money would be released within a few days. The cabinet in mid-March decided to allocate a total of €16 million for fixing potholes, but later decided that half of the sum would be distributed by regional authorities.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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